Skip to main content
Official Address United States Croquet Association
700 Florida Mango Road
West Palm Beach, Florida 33406
Contact P | (561) 478-0760
F | (561) 686-5507
E | membership@uscroquet.com
Add Me To Your Mailing List
Shopping Cart
cancel
HomeRankings
Background Image URL //s3.amazonaws.com/ClubExpressClubFiles/962311/graphics/Rankings_2003050642.jpeg

Croquet Grading System


The Croquet Grading System automatically ranks players based on their past performance in Association Croquet tournament play. Each player has a grade (a number between 850 and 2600). Ranking is done by listing the players in grade order. The player with the highest grade is ranked number one.

The official World Croquet Federation Association Croquet ranking lists are available at Chris Williams' Croquet Records Site for different regions of the world: World, North America, and United States. You can send in Association Croquet tournament results by following the directions posted at Sending in Results.

The official Croquet Association Golf Croquet ranking lists are available for the World, and for the UK and Ireland. You can send in Golf Croquet tournament results by following the directions posted at Golf Croquet Rankings.

How are American Players Handicapped for Association Croquet?


Hcap Grade
−2 2600
−1½ 2400
−1 2250
−½ 2100
0 2000
½ 1950
1 1900
1850
2 1800
1750
3 1700
1650
4 1600
1550
5 1500
6 1450
7 1400
8 1350
9 1300
10 1250
11 1200
12 1150
14 1100
16 1050
18 1000
20 950
22 900
24 850
If you are on the world ranking list, your grade is published there, and the conversion table on the right tells you what your Association Croquet handicap is. If you are not currently on the world ranking list but have an official USCA American Croquet handicap, add two to your American Croquet handicap to determine your Association Croquet handicap.

How is a Player's Grade Calculated?


Players' grades are adjusted after every tournament game reported to the world rankings site. The winner's grade is increased, and the loser's grade is decreased. How these changing grades are calculated is explained in detail on the Oxford Croquet website.

The current grades for all ranked players worldwide are available at the Croquet Grading System website. It gives you several ways to retrieve grades. Four of the most interesting are:
  1. Ranking List

    Press the Submit button to see the ranking of players meeting certain conditions. Scroll up or down the list, or use the Find tool (usually, Ctrl-F) to find a particular player. The default listing conditions are for the complete official WCF world rankings. You can change these conditions if you like. For example, you can see the rankings for different parts of the world.
  2. Event List

    Enter a year, and press the Submit button to see all the events in that year.
  3. Player Full Record

    Enter a first and last name, and press the Submit button, to see the results of all the games a person played. Then you can also see that player's record against all opponents.
  4. Player List

    Press the Submit button to see an alphabetical list of all the players. Then click on a player's name to see their grade and full record.

How are Grades Used in American Tournaments?


Players in a tournament are divided into flights based in part on their published grades. Each flight will have players in a limited range of grades. The tournament director chooses the grade ranges to achieve the desired number of players in each flight.

If flights are divided into blocks, the tournament director usually tries to have players in each block who have a full range of grades.

In knock-out play, the tournament director usually seeds players according to their grades.

Handicap Play


American players are encouraged to use their newly designated USCA Association Croquet handicaps in non-tournament and pick-up play. In Association Croquet play, the bisque (corresponding to the handicap number) permits an entirely new turn - unlike the American bisque, which can be used only for a do-over shot or for an additional shot after an earned continuation stroke.